Incredible India

October 2013

We are seated at our dinner table with our guests for the evening. Paul and Maureen are English, Françoise and Jean-Leopold are Swiss. Both couples have lived in different parts of the world and are very well travelled.  As conversation flows, my husband talks of the invitation he has just received.

We are going to a wedding in India, do you want to come along?’ he asks impulsively. To my surprise, both couples agree immediately. I am not sure that this is a good idea. They are widely travelled, yes, but India…is India.

They are all so very proper, how will they react to the chaos that is India?’, I ask myself doubtfully. Switzerland is orderly, pristine, timely, restrained, wealthy. India, in sharp contrast, is chaotic, dirty (at times filthy), unreserved, and with a great disparity in wealth. Normally when I visit India, I struggle with the differences for a few days and then learn to ignore them. But without the love that I feel for India, will my friends be able to ignore these differences which jar us so ? ‘This is going to be a disaster!’ I tell myself gloomily.

Reservations aside, I take over organizing the holiday at everyone’s request. Before long I have a plan in place; we are to attend the wedding for a week and then spend two more weeks in tourism. Our group swells to 10 with the addition of our daughter, Maitu, her friend Jas, and Paul and Maureen’s children Matthew and Ricarda. The younger contingent is made up of twenty somethings; the older ones range from mid-fifties to early seventies.


 

Attention : This is a mammoth post and I cannot imagine anyone being interested in everything, so here are links to the different sections. Feel free to jump ahead!

Kolkata
Darjeeling
Jaldapara National Park
Hampi
Badami
Goa


Feb 28 2014-Mar 5 2014 : Kolkata

Arriving at our hotel in Kolkata, I am excited to meet all the others and officially launch our holiday. Kenilworth turns out to be a good hotel choice. It is comfortable without being overwhelming, clean, with excellent service and a very good kitchen. It’s outdoor sitting area becomes our favourite place for R&R.

On that first day, there is a mad scramble to get Indian clothes organised for our English friends. My husband takes the boys to Bada Sahab near New Market and orders Sherwanis and Kurtas. I drag the ladies through multiple malls for Salwar Kameez and then through the many sari stores in Ballygunge. It is a long day but we achieve a lot.

Bride with her parents

There are five occasions for the marriage spread over six days. It starts with a ceremonial feeding of the bride, then the ceremonial starting of her getting dressed, an even more ceremonial wedding, a ceremonial farewell, a ceremonial lunch with the new bride as the hostess and finally a reception. Did I mention there is a lot of ceremony? And eating – each event is accompanied by a feast. Maitu tells me ‘They always ask if I ate well, that seems to be the most important thing!’ and laughs. She finds it all too long. There isn’t much of a party atmosphere; there is no alcohol, no dancing. I wonder if our friends are bored by it all but are too polite to say so. Still, it is all very colourful and if you are a people watcher, it is entertaining. Above, the bride in her glorious costume with her parents.

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In between, we manage a few touristic visits as well. My friends visit Victoria Memorial (photo by Maureen) on their own. Maitu and Jas visit Mother Teresa’s centre.

No visit to Kolkata can be complete without a trip to see the Hooghly, a distributary of the Ganges. It is muddy with silt, which is quite normal. The shores are strewn with garbage. ‘Ah my Holy river’, I think, ‘why do they treat you so?’ We stop by the burning ghats but I don’t take any pictures there.

We then visit Kumortuli, the potters quarter. Though they live close to poverty, their artistry is admirable. They produce idols of Gods and Goddesses for worship during the festivals. The little lanes are clean and the potters we see are welcoming. It is a very interesting area and I would like to visit it again just before Durga Puja, when they are at their busiest and most creative period.

Our last touristic stop is at the Dakshineshwar temple. It is rather crowded. I remember visits during my childhood when it had felt vast and silent, a place of contemplation and devotion. Now it looks like just another touristic site.

Mar 6, 2014– Mar 8, 2014 : Darjeeling

We fly from Kolkata to Bagdogra airport where we are met by our drivers. Our drive to Darjeeling through windy mountain roads takes almost three hours. I have taken some anti-nausea pills which make me drowsy, I hardly notice what passes by. We stop on the way for a light lunch of Momos which I quite fall in love with! Yum!

We are booked at Windamere, a hotel which holds on strongly to it’s Colonial past. The hotel looms on the hill over the Mall, with beautiful gardens and lovely old buildings. Our rooms are all in the building above. Everything has an old-world charm. For instance, the fireplace in each room is lit every evening and they tuck in hot water bottles in the bed every night!

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The living areas are equally charming with interesting old photographs decorating every wall. We spend warm, convivial evenings chatting and imbibing heart-warming fluids in the rooms above.

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That evening we explore the shops in the Mall (above, photo: Maureen) and the streets nearby. My husband remembers the Mall from his childhood visit as something bright and beautiful, with wonderful shops and charming houses. Now it all seems a bit dilapidated and dull. I had expected Darjeeling to be clean. I am disappointed; it is as dirty as any Indian city and very polluted.

The next morning we head out to the Happy Valley tea estate. We have an introduction to the managers and we are warmly welcomed. After a tour of the factory which is being renovated at present, we are taken for a stroll in the gardens. This is the best part of the tour; the tea gardens seem to spread as far as our eyes go and are stunningly beautiful.

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After our walk, Jean-Leopold, who has climbed mountains all his life, clambers back up to the factory by the steepest paths. As for me, even the normal paths seem steep enough! The manager tells us that he regularly walks through all of the tea estate, all 435 acres of it! Some of the bushes here are very old, planted nearly 150 years back. Living history!

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I do not normally enjoy visits to the zoo, worrying about the well-being of the animals. But the Darjeeling zoo is well-kept and I see some animals I have never seen before. After that we visit the mountaineering institute. There are some very interesting exhibits about various climbs to mount Everest. We return to the hotel after this to enjoy a very nice dinner and even nicer drinks.

This morning Françoise and Jean-Leopold leave us. They are going to Kerala for a few days before returning to Switzerland. The rest of us set off to first visit the Monastery at Dali, which is called Druk Sangag Choling Monastery. As we walk up the stairs, there is a prayer room at the right. I am reluctant to disturb the women who are turning huge cylindrical drums in prayer. Still further up we meet a number of young student monks, some as young as seven or eight. I wonder about them as I gaze at the hillside around me. Why did their parents send them away? Is it poverty? Beliefs? Are they destined to a life of prayer and celibacy, a life not of their choosing? Do they not miss their mothers’ presence in their lives?

Right at the top is this beautiful hall (above). We enter to see three huge statues, one of which is Lord Buddha (photography not permitted). About 30 monks march clockwise around a central structure, reciting prayers. Some read from books. Others know it by heart. They are of all ages, the oldest seems to be in his forties, the youngest not older than six. Some are curious about us and stare. Others don’t even notice us. As I sit and listen, the sound of their prayers resonates inside me. It is peaceful. Can sounds be holy? This sound is holy. As the chanting draws me within itself, I feel very blessed to be here.

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Next we go to Darjeeling station to take the tourist round trip to Ghoom. The so called Toy Train (above left, a picture of a picture from the museum) has been accorded the UNESCO world heritage status due to the engineering feats in its construction. I am amused to see Paul as excited as a child in a toyshop to see the old retired steam engines! At Ghoom, there is a small railway museum which tells you all about this train; here is link if you are interested. The train at times passes mere inches from people’s homes or shops. I take the mandatory cheesy holiday pic with my husband.

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Walking back from the station to our hotel, we all fall victim to the lure of shawls and scarves temptingly displayed in many storefronts. They are so beautiful! Before we know, we are all the happy owners of several irresistible items of neck/shoulder wear. The evening is spent cosily closeted in the drawing room of the hotel, snuggling in my new shawl in front of a roaring fire, with a nice drink in my hand. What could be better?

Mar 9, 2014-Mar 10, 2014 : Jaldapara National Park

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We wake up early this morning, hoping to have a glimpse of Kanchenjunga. But it remains as elusive as it has been the previous few days. Wrong time of the year, I am told. Oh well, it is a reason to come back to Darjeeling one day.

We set off towards Jaldapara National Park in two cars. It is a lovely ride. Near Coronation Bridge (above) we stop at a little cafe for tea. We have a lovely encounter with the family which runs it. It takes nearly four hours to reach the forest and we are rather tired.

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At the Tourist Lodge (photo: Maureen), we are told that they have vacancies in the newer bungalows. These turn out to be very nice indeed and we are very comfortable. Maitu complains next morning about monkeys waking her up all night with a fusillade of stone fruits on the roof, so if you are a light sleeper, this is not for you!

We are soon met my Mithun Das, the guide whom I had contacted from Switzerland. Elephant safaris are not bookable by normal channels; Mithun has an inside contact and he confirms our booking for the first safari at 6 am the next day. We dine at the Tourist Lodge after a walk in the nearby village.

Early next morning, we drive to the Hollong guest house (above). Even though this is not as new and spiffy as the bungalows we are staying at, its location is far superior. Mithun says that he could have booked these if we had done so 4-5 months in advance. If any of you are inspired to go to Jaldapara, do book a stay here.

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I am charmed as soon as the elephants start walking up the path towards us. All are lady elephants; one of them has a 9 month old baby-girl as a shadow. For me, it is love at first sight! She is beyond gorgeous! Mithun murmurs to the mahouts and we get to ride on the little one’s mum. She follows us at times and darts forward to lead at others. Every now and then she stops to have a scratch against a rock, pull at some leaves (she is still on mother’s milk only) and squirts dirt and mud on herself. I could watch her antics all day!

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The scenery around us is surreal. The sun is just rising, there is a light mist hanging just above the ground. The birds have woken up and are chirping in the distance. As we enter the grasslands, it all seems to grow quiet. The other elephants walk slowly in the distance. Ours rocks us gently, evading tripping over her little one who darts this way and that. Sounds seem dampened. It is an other-worldly atmosphere, difficult to describe, impossible to encompass in a digital image alone. One of the most beautiful moments of my life, a moment to treasure.

The mahout suddenly stops and points us towards the rhinos. Slowly the elephant walks towards them; soon we are but 20 feet from them. They seem oblivious. It is thrilling to see wild animals in their natural habitat. If you want to know more about this animal, click here. We see four rhinos in all. We also see plenty of birdlife from peacocks to hornbills.

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I say goodbye to the little one and her mama. She is one gorgeous girl, isn’t she?

We come back to the Lodge for breakfast. Some of us then head out to a tribal village called Totopara. The others are visiting an animal rescue facility. The village is very remote and in wet season it is totally isolated. We cross a large dry riverbed to get there.

It is beautiful and green with a predominance of betel-nut trees.

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We also see some jackfruits and a papaya tree. The people are hard at work bring down betel nuts. We continue on an uphill track; the guide promises to take us within spitting distance of Bhutan. But the heat and the climb tires me. Ricarda and I perch on a rock while while Maitu and Jas walk on. They come back soon abandoning their mission due to lack of time.

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That evening we set off on a jeep safari. We are lucky enough to spot an Indian Bison, also called Gaur. I had expected a look-alike of the American bison. Instead it looks just like a huge bad-tempered buffalo. I am told that it is one of the most dangerous animals here. It does seem to have a serious attitude problem when it stares at us so!

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The highlight of the afternoon is watching a huge bull elephant crossing our track. That evening we excitedly look through our photos, trying to relive a wonderful day.

Mar 11, 2014-Mar 12, 2014 : Kolkata

The next morning we set off towards the airport, about 2.5 hrs away. On the way we pass many tea gardens where picking has already started. The scenery is outstanding.

Back at the Kenilworth, we have two days to get our laundry done and catch up on chores. I have cushion covers being tailored which I need to collect (excellent fit for my sofas!). Paul and my husband have to give one last trial of their business suits and collect them tomorrow morning (What a bargain! What good fit!). Maureen has to get back to Barkat Ali who has promised to get her favourite dress copied. My husband has a couple of family visits. Jas, Maitu and I want to pack off a bag to courier to Mumbai to avoid lugging it around in our Southern travels. The day passes busily.…

Mar 13, 2014-Mar 15, 2014 : Hampi

The holiday is over for Paul and my husband; they take their international flights out this morning. The rest of us pack up and take a flight to Bangalore. There we are met by our dear friends who collect us, feed us, and then load us safely onto our night train to Hampi.

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Our friends recommend catching it at the Cantonment station where it stops for only 2 minutes. In spite of local help, it is stressful to get all of us and our baggage into the train. The train leaves at 10pm and arrives at Hampi at 7am. We all manage to sleep, even poor Matthew who, at 6’4’’ needs to take a foetal position to fit on the berth !

We are met by our driver Umesh at the Hospet station. We drive to Vijayashree Resort which I have booked for 2 nights. This is half way between Hospet and Hampi; I had not found anything I liked closer to the monuments. Not a suitable hotel if you don’t have your own transportation. The rooms are individual bungalows set in very nice gardens. The place is run by Rajasthanis which is quite surprising to see in the middle of Karnataka! The rooms are very comfortable and well decorated but it all seems like a very ambitious project by someone who doesn’t quite know how to maintain it. This, like everything else in the Hampi region, is vegetarian and serves no alcohol.

197 Raghunatha Temple

After breakfast, we set off towards Hampi, about 20 mins away. Hampi was the capital of the Vijayanagara empire which ruled in South India between the 14th to the 16th century. Spread over 25 sq. kms, there are many monuments attesting to the glory of the empire that was. Some monuments are in good condition, others in ruins. The setting is rural with villages, fields and orchards. Hampi is a UNESCO world heritage site.

We are met at Hampi by our guide Manjunath whom I have hired for two days. We head first to the Raghunatha Temple at Malayavanta hill. Our guide’s English is first difficult to understand, as also his forays between mythology and history. But we settle down to his style; he is very informative. This temple was built in the 16th century by the Chalukyas. There is great mythological significance to this whole area which is called Kishkinda in the Ramayana (a great Hindu epic). I am surprised to hear North Indian style chanting at the temple. There is a group listening also to a lecture in Hindi to celebrate Holi.

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We walk up to the top of the Hill behind the temple. This is our first view of the landscape at Hampi. I am enthralled by the sight of monuments and boulders, one merging into another, interspersed with palms and green fields. Stunning!

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Next we head to see the Queen’s Bath in the Zanana enclosure. It is interesting to see a mix of Hindu and Islamic styles here. The guide tells us that the guards were female as well. I imagine little Indian Amazonians (paradoxical!) strolling on the parapet wielding swords and daggers, peering us at our invasion into their private area!

We go next to the Royal enclosure which looks very much like a vast archaeological site.

Close to our entry point is a huge platform with beautifully carved sides and a flight of steps leading to the top. This is called the Mahanavami Dibba and was use by royalty on festive occasions. There is no shade here and it is about 36 C or higher. We are wilting. The pale skin of my friends cannot last long under this onslaught.

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A few metres away is a stepped tank which reminds me of a similar one in Rajasthan. I wonder if there is any connection? The tank is filled by an aqueduct (above right). I would have loved to linger and explore the many sites here. But dissuaded by the heat, we ask to be led out to somewhere with shade.

226 Hazara Rama Temple

The Hazara Rama temple is just outside the Royal Enclosure. It was used by the kings as a private place of prayer. The walls are beautifully carved with episodes from the Ramayana. We spend a little time here but we really want a break. We stop for lunch at the Mango restaurant in Hampi and then go back to the hotel for a rest.

After spending the afternoon safely away from the sun, we meet the guide for another couple of hours of tourism. We start at the Lakshmi Narasimha temple. This representation of Narasimha is very different to ones I am used to. The face doesn’t really look leonine to me. An arresting image, but a trifle scary don’t you think?

Our next stop is the Sri Krishna temple. This was built in 1513 AD as a celebration of victory over the kingdom of Utkala. In the setting sun, the stones shine like gold. It must be too hot for everybody; there are no tourists except us here.

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What a pleasure to see monuments all by oneself! Our group disperses and we wander around taking pictures and admiring the artwork.

265 Sasivekalu (mustard) ganesha

Dusk is approaching as we reach the Sasivekalu Ganesh (or Mustard Ganesh) temple. Built in 1506 AD, the idol is carved from one huge 8 foot boulder.

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Hemakunta hill is fascinating with its boulder formations and many monuments and shrines. Some are rudimentary, others quite elaborate. The temples on this hill pre-date the Vijayanagara empire. Built between 9th and 14th centuries, all are Shaivaite shrines. None are used at present as a place of worship. Instead, it has become a land of monkeys. Earlier in the day, I had been frightened by a monkey trying to grab my water bottle. But they still fascinate me as I take many pictures of their activities.

The top of the hill is an almost flat sheet of granite. I peep in and out of shrines and almost miss the sunset which we have come to see.

I am just in time to take in the glory of the setting sun. But I feel a bit rushed; I had been much too distracted. I decide to come back here tomorrow evening to watch the sun set once more. With the sun dipping below the horizon, light reduces rapidly. The guards hurry us out of the hill and we clamber down just as the gate closes. We are all quite tired and happy to retreat to our hotel rooms.

I feel grumpy this morning; the breakfast is not at all to my taste. Sigh! I cheer up as we head out to another day of sightseeing. We start today with the Kadalakelu Ganesh temple. The huge 15 feet Ganesh is carved out of a single boulder. It looks as if the shrine was then constructed around this idol. I am saddened to see how the idol has been defaced by the invaders. The many pillared hall is quite beautiful. The morning light casts lovely shadows. I had hoped that today will be cooler but the heat is already starting on the rise.

We are back at the Hemakunta Hill to visit the Virupaksha Temple (far right).

Virupaksha temple is the only one so far that we have had to pay an entry fee for. Unlike most of the temples, this is still in use as a place of worship. I understand that this has been a functioning temple since its inception in 7 AD. Of course the structure as it stands now was built over centuries. The mantapa above, for example, is from 1510 AD. There are some finely painted ceilings in this hall which we admire. There are many outstanding carvings as well. We stream past the sanctum but I don’t feel prayerful. ‘Can a place of worship be a tourist site and still maintain its sanctity?’ I ask myself.

Leaving the temple, we walk between the now empty Hampi Bazaar towards Matanga Hill. Our guide tells us that the bazaar used to be a lively place until but recently. The government moved the people away in order to preserve the area and now it lies lonely and desolate. You can see the Virupaksha temple in the horizon above and the market stalls which lead up to it.

The Matanga hill is beautiful with many wonderful rock formations and a few small shrines. And when one crosses the crest, there is a wonderful view of the landscape with the Achyutaraya temple in the foreground.

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Here is a close up. Doesn’t it look exactly like the ruins where King Louie sings ‘I wanna be like you’ in Jungle book?

Built in 1534 AD, the Achyutaraya temple was one of the last grand projects before the fall of the empire. I am pleased that we have this stunning temple all to ourselves. Is it not odd that I myself am a tourist but am glad that no other tourists are around? Still, one cannot sense the atmosphere of a place when one is surrounded by chattering hordes. We cannot linger; I am sorry to go on about the sun but it is getting to the unbearable stage by now. We look for spots of shade to cower under.

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This temple is just amazing! Photo opportunities abound..

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We exit from the Achyutaraya temple, walking in the corridors of the Courtesans’ street. After walking past the temple tank (above right) we reach the shores of the Tungabhadra river.

The landing place on the left is called the Chakratirtha Ghat. We sit for a while on the river side, sipping fresh coconut water, watching the activities nearby. I am soon lost in my imagination of this world as it once was, busy with boat traffic, pedlars, royalty, mendicants, holy men..oh how vibrant it would all have been!

The others are happy to have some quiet time looking at the river too. My Hindu self makes a stand and demands that I visit the temple when I am so close to its door, so I take a quick peek into the Kodanda Rama temple. It is crowded with worshippers. The guide tells me there is a Hanuman temple close by which he visits every week. ‘Empires come and empires go’ I think ‘but the stones still draw in worshippers! Will it always be so?’

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We decide to take a ride in a Coracle boat (the baskets, above left) to our next destination. I am hesitant as I step into the basket; I don’t swim! But it feels quite steady. The boat  takes 8 people with no trouble. Despite my hesitation, it turns out to be a lovely experience and we all enjoy it very much.

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The perspective from water level is very different. We pass interesting looking shrines along the river. We are told by our guide that after the monsoon, when the river flows full, many of these are totally underwater.

At the other end of our boat ride is the Vitthala Temple, the extravagant showpiece of Hampi. This is not just a temple but a temple complex with many shrines and halls. Originally built in the 15th century, it was enhanced by kings over time. The stone chariot above is an icon of Hampi. The entry ticket that we got at the Virupaksha temple is valid here as well.

This is a truly beautiful temple complex with some of most elaborate carvings that we have seen so far. The heat beats down on us mercilessly, rendering everything into bleached sunlight or deep darkness. The world seems quiet here and very old. The guide tries to point out interesting carvings to us but we are all too hot to pay attention.

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Instead, I just absorb the essence of the place, clicking pictures from the safety of a shady spot. When it is time to leave, I feel reluctant to go. I want to see this temple in the sunset, but it cannot be. ‘I’ll come back’ I tell myself. Even as I think it, I have to acknowledge that it is probably unlikely. It’s hard to acknowledge that.

Our next destination is the Lotus Mahal, back in the zanana enclosure. Jas says that this was her favourite monument from her last visit. But I am not really drawn to it.

Our last stop is at the Elephant’s Stables built in the 15th century in an Indo-Islamic style. The various stalls are all connected by man-sized doorways. I stand there imagining the elephants shaking trunks through them! This is our last stop and we say goodbye to the guide and head back to the hotel. After lunch, I have a little snooze and then we all head back to Hemakunta hill for a second shot at the sunset view.

There is a stream of tourists walking up the steps of the hill. I almost feel as if I am getting to see a theatrical production! Everyone takes up a spot, some on boulders, others on monuments, all facing west. The sky is a vast screen after all, nothing is going to hide this show!

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The sun doesn’t disappoint. Its a great show of light and energy that it puts on. ‘Isn’t this wonderful’, I think to myself, ‘I have seen so many man made wonders here but not one of them comes anywhere near what nature can do every single day?’.  I have a wonderful, satisfied feeling when we rise finally and say goodbye to Hampi.

Mar 16, 2014-Mar 17, 2014 : Badami

We head to Badami on the day before Holi. This is relevant because on the way to Badami we are stopped by a gang of hooligans. They are all quite high on alcohol and/or drugs. They surround our little mini-bus and try to open the doors and windows. I am quite anxious. Our driver never loses his cool. When he gets an opportunity, he slowly starts rolling the car and soon we are out of it. We see evidence of other road blocks on the way. I am happy to arrive safely at our hotel.

The Krishna Heritage is relatively new. Our rooms are excellent, with a bathroom as big as most hotel rooms and even an outdoor shower! However the fear of the monkeys which often drop in into the veranda-shower keeps me from testing this out. The restaurant is a nice airy place to relax. We settle down, have lunch and decide to stay in till the afternoon to allow the holi-revellers to go back home.

We are in Badami to see the four caves carved into sandstone hills. Ajanta and Ellora are in a far grander scale, but Badami has its own charm.The first cave is a temple of Shiva in the form of Nataraja dated 578 AD. The carving above is quite unique with 18 hands. The combinations of left and right hands forms traditional mudras or gestures of the classical dance Bharatanatyam. I am very taken by this beautiful representation of Shiva, the Lord of Dance.

The second and third caves are in honour of Vishnu. The third is quite the most elaborate and beautiful one (above). The last cave is Jain and was built about 100 years after the others.

After seeing the caves, we take a walk around to the other side of the lake. The path is filthy. Dogs and pigs lie listlessly in garbage. Children are playing and women gossiping outside their little homes. There is a museum here but we don’t plan to visit it. The hills look beautiful from this side. You can see the Bhoothnath temple at the other end of the lake above. That is the end of our sight seeing today. We get back to our hotel and enjoy a nice dinner.

As today is Holi we decide to not leave the hotel until the afternoon. I had originally planned to visit both Pattadakkal and Aihole, but I decide to drop the latter. I am disappointed but then I am a monument junkie. The others all seem lacklustre and I see that I have failed in my planning. ‘We should have headed out to Goa today’, I think. Sigh!

When we leave in the afternoon to see Pattadakkal, the roads are quite clear of the revellers and I breathe a sigh of relief. The road to Pattadakkal is quite awful and the abject poverty of the villages we pass saddens me. With Bangalore booming, surely the state of Karnataka is rich enough to improve conditions for the poor? Why are so many people living in tents ? Why do the children look so wraith-like? Please India, do something !

Pattadakkal is site with a number of temples and shrines in a mix of Dravidan (South Indian) and Nagara (North Indian) styles.  This is an excellently maintained site, very neat and clean. There has been quite a bit of reconstruction work done I believe. A UNESCO world heritage site, these monuments are from the 7th and 8th centuries. I am quite excited as I have not seen many monuments from that era. I struggle to remember, what was happening in Europe then? Who was building what? I can’t quite remember.

527 Pattadakkal

The carvings are very beautiful, especially in the Virupaksha temple. The huge statue of Nandi the bull, carved out of a single boulder and hand polished,  is quite outstanding. We spend perhaps an hour in Pattadakkal. Back at the hotel, it is another quiet evening. We are all tired from our tourism and it is time for something more relaxing.

Mar 18, 2014-Mar 21, 2014 : Goa

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We leave Badami by 6 am. It is a long drive to our hotel in Goa but quite a pleasant one. We reach the Park Hyatt by about 2pm, stopping only for breakfast. The hotel is excellent with an enviable location. It’s a large property with beautiful gardens, restaurants and cosy little corners and direct access to a wonderful beach. And a spa. Highly recommended.

We dive happily into the sybaritic pleasures that the resort offers us. I abandon the idea of heading into Panaji for some sightseeing. That can wait for another trip. Instead I enjoy long walks on the beach, excellent mojitos, breakfasts to die for, ayurvedic massages and simply lazing around reading my book under an umbrella. Here are some pictures for you to appreciate the ambiance !

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So on that note, I will end this marathon post. In spite of my misgivings, my friends have taken all of India’s shortcomings in their stride. I had deliberately planned a variety of places for our trip – a big city, a hill-station, a wild life park, an important historical site and finally a luxurious beach holiday. Not everything appealed to everybody; that is indeed a hard ask. But on balance, each of us found something to take pleasure in so I shall count it as a successful holiday.

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13 thoughts on “Incredible India

  1. Lovely write up Suja.so alive that I almost felt that I was sightseeing along with you!thx for that and lovely pics!

  2. Suja, Incredible ‘Post’ about Incrdible India! What took you and your friends days/weeks and loads-of-money to cover, I could do it in 49 minutes and at an expense of charges for a few MBs of BroadBand usage! I ‘virtually’ accompanied your group all through and thoroughly enjoyed the thrills of visiting Incredible India!!

    I have one major complaint/grouse, though : Suja, you knew that I stay in Goa and yet missed sending me an Email of your visit to Goa – March 18th to March 21st. I’d have loved to come out and meet you and your group. Perhaps, next time you are here, I may still be around-&-kicking – to meet you.

    Keep traveling and keep Sharing. – Raj

    • Thank you Raj, I am glad you enjoyed the story of our travels 🙂 I am sorry to have missed the opportunity to meet you but if I am in Goa again, I will get in touch.
      Cheers. Suja

  3. Wonderful post Suja, which can be read in just under an hour (!) So mammoth-like, but not impossible! I mostly enjoyed (and felt close to) your tourist-musing thoughts which you record going through the various aspects of the trip. For example your question about the contrast between touristic and saintly purposes. I think this quandary is perhaps why certain holy places forbid photography: When we are tourists, it is hard to make people understand that we can also be motivated by interior interests, and this also refers to the opposition between regularity and one-timeness. Spirituality needs the repeated practice to be authentic: it makes sense only if the religious gestures enter the everyday repetition of days and nights which are the fabric of human life. Coming only once and snatching photos is easily construed as a shortcut of this long-lasting practice. Not that people would feel jealous of you taking this shortcut, but perhaps insulted that you summarize their practice into an instantaneous photo? And so perhaps this is why we appreciate it if we are the only tourists at one spot: we can immerse ourselves more into something like the lives and practices of the regular inhabitants, and of course protect ourselves from the thoughts of other tourists who are sharing (perhaps) our feelings about the inadequacy of our being there.
    cheers, yves

    • Thank you Yves 🙂 You have said something rather profound in saying that ‘Spirituality needs the repeated practice to be authentic: it makes sense only if the religious gestures enter the everyday repetition of days and nights which are the fabric of human life’. I have never thought of spirituality in those terms, it gives me something to ponder over. And I agree with you about why we like the thought of being the only tourists in a place..one can indeed participate better in the ‘normal’ life of a place.
      Cheers. Suja

      • Yes, I think in fact rituals are just that, a practice which becomes meaningful only when it is re-cognized because it is re-peated. The concept of a ritual performed only once is almost absurd.

  4. Very great post. I just stumbled upon your weblog and wished to say that I’ve
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    • Thank you Alejandrina! I apologise for the delayed reply; your message had somehow gone to the junk folder which I didn’t check! Thank you for subscribing! I write from time to time, not really regularly but I recently wrote a post on Russia which you may enjoy..

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