Easter Weekend : Parma, Bologna and Ravenna

It is Easter soon and my husband will have four days off from work. I would like to take advantage of it but am reluctant to plan anything complicated. We have just returned from a long trip to India which had required much organising and so I am quite put off at the thought of any grand plans. I look at Google maps and my eyes fall on Bologna. Our friends had mentioned it as a charming place to visit; the decision is easily made.

18 April 2014

We are up at 5 am, intending to leave by 6. As always we dither over something or the other and do not leave until 6:30. Still, the roads are quiet and we make good time to the Saint Bernard tunnel. There is still evidence of snow at this altitude though it is not cold. The roads in Italy get busier. We stop for pizza lunch at Piacenza and reach Parma in the early afternoon. As planned, I want a quick look-see before getting to Bologna.

Parma 1 no us

I am not in the mood for any major tourism; I just want to check out the place and get a feel for it. Busy looking around us, we miss the ‘pedestrians and authorised vehicles only’ sign and venture happily into the city centre. But I get a feeling…’This looks like a pedestrian area’ I tell my husband ‘Lets get out quickly’. My husband is not sure about my ‘feelings’ but I am right after all! We feel lucky for not having been fined! After parking, we admire the nice Piazza della Pilotta, peer into the tourist office and have a hot drink before having a wander. There are plenty of young people in the piazza. Students? I wonder. Is there some educational institution close by?

Parma 2 Garibaldi square

Our stroll takes us to large and impressive Garibaldi square. My tourist book tells me that this is where the Romans had a forum. It’s a busy square with the town hall, the Governer’s Palace and a nice statue of Mr.Garibaldi (General/Politician) to watch over it all.

Parma 3 Duomo

Next halt, the cathedral. The 12th century Romanesque Cathedral looks quite plain from outside. But when I step in, I am rendered breathless by the beauty of the frescos! The vivid colours! It’s a joyful looking cathedral, I like it very much indeed. The Cupola by Corregio is famous.

Parma 4 San Giovanni

We cannot come to Parma and not take a picture of its ham, can we? I am pleased with my photo with our reflections alongside the ham..it places us squarely in Parma! Our last stop is the San Giovanni church which features another cupola by Corregio. To the left of it is a 16th century monastery with its tranquil cloisters.

We get back to the car and set off towards Bologna, about an hour from Parma. Out hotel is in a quiet neighbourhood outside the city walls, about 15 min walk from the centre. We are quite happy with it, That night we have dinner at Osteria Broccaindosso, a short walk from the hotel. With a limited menu, it serves delicious Bolognese food and the host was very hospitable. Recommended.

19 April 2014

We are lucky to have a local Italian friend who has offered to show us around his town. My pictures below are from our walk with him, a latter walk by ourselves the same day and a walk on 21st morning before we head back.

Bologna 1 Towers

One cannot visit Bologna without noticing the Due Torri, a symbol of the city. One of them leans drunkenly, while the other stands tall and strong. The city is said to have more that 180 towers in the 12th and 13th centuries. I wonder how it looked! Seems there was some one-upmanship in tower building; height equated with power and wealth, I would imagine. Less than 20 survive today, the tallest being Asinelli Tower (97m) in the photo above.

Bologna 2 Porticos no us

Bologna is famous for its miles and miles (wiki says 38 kms in the city centre) of covered porticos. Our friend tells us that on a rainy day one can walk from one end of town to another without getting wet at all! These porticos are very charming, some quite plain, others highly decorated. These give the city a very unique look.

Bologna 3 Piazza Maggiore

As in many European cities, the Cathedral square is impressive in its size and the beauty of its architecture, Bologna matches up to all my expectations. Note the handsome Neptune fountain in the picture above. The upper part of the Cathedral is uncovered brick, it seems they ran out of money while renovating it. This gives the Cathedral an interesting air.

Bologna 4 Piazza ri Enzo

Piazza ri Enzo is adjacent to the Cathedral square. The old Pallazzo looms over the road, looking mildly grim. Our friend informs us that it is used for hosting business events etc.

Bologna 5 Markets Shops Restaurants

Bologna has a busy and vibrant market place. There are lovely looking delis, fruit and vegetable markets, cheese shops selling enormous blocks of cheese, book shops and a Saturday Market selling the usual market-ware. I take it all in, enjoying the buzz that a market produces. I do like Italy!

Bologna 7 Basilica San Stefano

The Basilica San Stefano is very interesting. It is a complex of five churches in one, ranging from the 4th to the 13th centuries. I don’t believe I have ever seen a 4th or 5th century church before; I am interested to see how different the ancient church looks to the churches of today. None of the churches are heavily decorated, but I still like it very much.

Bologna 6 Cathedral Sant Pietro

I have a quick look inside the Cattedrale Metropolitana di San Pietro; it deserves a more leisurely explore but the others are not much into churches and I feel guilty about making them wait. There is a marvellous terracotta sculpture by Alfonso Lombardi (16th Century) which catches my attention. The expressions of the figures are so real!

Bologna 8 San Domenico

Best for last – the Basilica di San Domenico has a chapel for the Saint with his remains in an exquisitely carved sarcophagus. The carvings are such a delight! I cannot find the words to express how beautiful I find them! What amazing artistry! What an imagination! For me, this is the highlight of our trip. I walk around to the back. There is a skull inside a reliquary; is it really that of the Saint? A little macabre, no?

20 April 2014 Ravenna

Ravenna 1

The amazing Basilica of San Vitale is an early Christian church with a highly decorated interior quite unlike other churches I have seen. My guide book says that this kind of Mosaic work is the best outside Constantinople; I can well believe that! No photos can do this justice, you just have to see it for yourself! The shape of the church, an octagon, is also interesting. The access to the Mausoleum of Galla Placidia (5th century) is from its gardens. again, I admire the Byzantine mosaics.

Ravenna 2

Next we visit the Baptistery of Neon (4th-5th century), the oldest monument in the city (above left). Again, this is octagonal. ‘Is there any significance in that? Is the number 8 sacred in any way?’ I wonder. The Cathedral is next to it behind which is the museum which we visit. There are a few quite interesting exhibits but photography is not permitted inside.

Ravenna 3

Seeing that Dante’s Tomb is here, I demand to see it. We wander around a bit lost but that’s ok, I quite enjoy the walk and admiring the architecture. Dante’s tomb in itself is quite a simple structure (above bottom left and right).

Ravenna 4

We next visit the Basilica Apollinaire Nuovo (6th century), again with some wonderful mosaic decorations (above top).  The last monument we visit is the Arian Baptistery (4th-5th century). I am very satisfied with our visit to Ravenna as I have seen some of the oldest churches in Europe. Ravenna Tourism is very organised; there is one ticket for all monuments and they provide a good map with it.

Ravenna 5-2

We wander back to the car, admiring the impressive Piazza del Popolo which is buzzing with life. On the way back to Bologna, we take a small detour to admire the port and the canal.

21st April 2014

We take a morning stroll in Bologna, taking pictures and checking out places we had missed before. This is a very photogenic town, my eye is caught by many an attractive corner. This has been a good little break; it is with a feeling of contentment that we wave goodbye to Bologna.

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6 thoughts on “Easter Weekend : Parma, Bologna and Ravenna

  1. “This is a very photogenic town”
    Suja, that’s a lovely expression – very original from you, I’m sure!
    And, you’ve made the ‘photogenic town’ come alive with lovely photographs and commentary – all of which made me feel I am taking the ‘tour’ with you and your husband (hope I’m not being ‘कबाब्-मे-हद्दि’!
    Yeh-dil-maange-more.

    Best Wishes.
    Raj

    • Hi Raj,
      As my blog is directed towards armchair travellers, I am pleased if it makes a trip come alive for you! Thank you for your kind comments.
      Cheers. Suja

  2. Hi Suja,
    Thanks for this introduction to Bologna and Ravenna, where we’re going this summer! We’re exchanging houses with Italians there. I believe the octogon makes sense because 8 is the Christian “improvement” of the 7 days of Biblical Creation. Christ was risen on a Sunday, the first day of the week, which is also the eighth.
    yves

    • Oh, your house exchange sounds nice Yves! I visit so many places, but only flying visits. It would be nice to stay for a longer time somewhere and get to know it better! Thank you for educating me about the importance of number 8, I was rather curious about it. Cheers. Suja

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